Jay Lake: Writer

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[links] Link salad doesn’t know why they changed it, it cannot say

Come Support the Jay Lake Auction at RadCon, Sunday at 1pm! — That’s today, in Pasco, WA.

The 2014 Sony World Photography Awards — (Thanks to Lisa Costello.)

This goat simulator looks like maybe the best video game ever — Uh…

This Crow Is The Smartest Bird You’ve Ever Seen — (Thanks to Lisa Costello.)

How the vastly improbable has determined what animals got where — Personally, I’ve always wondered why the North American bird census is so different west of the Rockies.

Deep sea (mesopelagic) fish biomass 10 times more than previously thought

ICE/ISEE-3 to return to an Earth no longer capable of speaking to it — This is poetic and strange.

Young American adults abandon religion in record numbers

Understanding Polygamy — The comment thread on this Feminist Mormon Housewives post is very strange and difficult to read if you don’t share their Mormon faith framework.

Pat Robertson begs Ken Ham to shut up“Let’s be real,” Robertson begged, “let’s not make a joke of ourselves.” Uh, Pat, the reality-based community appreciates the sentiment, but you’re way too late for that.

Babylonian Tale of Round Ark Draws Ire From Christian Circles — Ah, literalism.

Three endangered whooping cranes shot in US — See guns make everything better! And everyone who carries deadly force is socially responsible, and so completely trustworthy.

Justice Department To Launch Push For Full Recognition Of Same-Sex Marriage — Another push on the row of bigotry dominoes. Just as with evolution denial, this is a one-sided “issue” without a credible argument against.

Republican Official Says Gays Should Be Purged From GOP, Blames Homosexuality On Satan

8 Former Republicans Who Ditched the Extremist GOP

?otD: Did people just like it better that way?


2/9/2014
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 7.75 hours (fitful)
Body movement: 10 minutes stationary bike (resuming exercise post-operative)
Weight: n/a (traveling)
Number of FEMA troops on my block who aren’t descended from monkeys: 0
Currently reading: n/a

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[links] Link salad gazes across the frigid Atlantic at the sunrise

Come Support the Jay Lake Auction at RadCon, Sunday at 1pm! — Ah, my friends.

Photos: Time Capsule Mansion Opened After 100 Years — Wow… (Via Lisa Costello.)

A Venn diagram cartoon — Hahahah.

The Patient, the Provider, and Participatory Medicine—Are We a House Divided? — (Snurched from Casey Quinlan.)

A Creepy Medical Tour Of The Past — I’m not sure I’d describe all of these as creepy, but they are fascinating.

Apple fires up new furnaces for iPhone 6’s sapphire screenUnbreakable screen tech heading Apple’s way.

Young Salmon Born Knowing Migration Route Without any prior migration experience, juvenile Chinook salmon can find their way to ancestral feeding grounds by using the Earth’s magnetic field and an inherited internal map, according to a new study.

Earliest footprints outside Africa discovered in Norfolk

Nasa’s Mars Curiosity Rover’s First Photo Of EarthThe distance between Earth and Mars when Curiosity took the photo, which includes the moon, was about 99 million miles.

Night Hides the World — Another beautiful night sky image, with an interesting explanation, from APOD.

Thoughts on Planetary Migration

Seeing science: The year’s best visualizationsThe National Science Foundation and Science name 2013’s best.

Calvin & Muad’Dib on religion — I love this piece, and I love this series.

Answers for Creationists — Phil Plait answers the Creationist questionsposted after the Bill Nye-Ken Ham “debate”, with grace and patience.

Alabama Chief Justice Jumps Into Gay Marriage FightMoore said that “a great majority of the American people want to hold to the definition that a marriage is between a man and a woman. Uh, no. Not if you believe the polling or voting patterns. Of course, if you decide to believe that polls are skewed and elections are stolen, then I guess evidence doesn’t matter.

Stupid Irish Homophobes and Their Big Homophobic Fail — This is very similar to conservative dialectic in this country.

Assault on California Power Station Raises Alarm on Potential for TerrorismApril Sniper Attack Knocked Out Substation, Raises Concern for Country’s Power Grid. I have seen coverage on this before, but I’m amazed at how little. Perhaps because firearms were involved, rather than explosives. Somebody was out exercising their right to a theoretical defense of essential liberties. (Via [info]danjite.)

Dread Pirate Roberts 2.0: An interview with Silk Road’s new bossNew leader wants Silk Road to publish gov’t secrets; calls old DPR a “fraud.” This is very strange, as is everything to do with the Deep Web, which is incredibly science fictional while also being quite real.

Lobbying is a Lucrative Investment, Researchers Find Using CRP Data — Duh? (Via [info]danjite.)

Six Economic Benefits of the Affordable Care Act

Still don’t have health insurance? The Obama administration is trying to find you.

GOP Rep: Even Jesus Couldn’t Control House Republicans — Hahaha.

?otD: Did you get weathered out of work or school today?


2/7/2014
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 8.25 hours (solid)
Body movement: n/a (post-operative)
Weight: n/a (traveling)
Number of FEMA troops on my block who aren’t descended from monkeys: 0
Currently reading: n/a

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[cancer|science] Touring the TIL Cell laboratory, finding big science in my genes

Yesterday, the scientist in charge of some of the big science behind my TIL cell therapy took us on a tour of his lab, as well as a flyby of the TIL Cell lab, where they are growing my wee little TIL cells to their full robustness (ca. 30-100 billion cells at the end of the process). (I did secure permission to mention his name and use of these photos, for noncommercial purposes such as this blog.) Dr. Eric Tran, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section was kind enough to spend an hour walking us around and talking through the biology of what Dr. Rosenberg’s group is hoping to do for me.

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Dr. Tran his own self.

As is the case with most bio labs I’ve seen, at first glance there’s not all that much to look at. Everything important is happening in little dishes inside of incubators. But there’s still cool science stuff sitting around, and cool science people doing cool science things. And since this science has a great deal to do with the current attempt to extend my life and wrest more time from the thieving arms of cancer, I was very glad to see what I could see and learn what I could learn.

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Typical lab sign. I took this to mean “don’t eat your lunch in here”.

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Except this one. I took this one to mean “don’t even think about ever having eaten your lunch in here”.

Dr. Tran showed us the door to the lab where my main cultures are growing right now. They are culturing both my B cells and TIL cells. The B cells are in part to provide a medium for the TIL cells, and part to do Science!!! with me as the human petri dish. The lab is off-limits for non-workers, for reasons of safety and sterility. (The cell cultures’ safety and sterility, not ours.)

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The lab where little bits of me are rapidly becoming lots more little bits of me. Hi, kids!

He then took us down to another lab where other human TIL cells are being cultivated for experimental work rather than clinical treatment.

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The official TIL cell lab, where bits of me ain’t.

There we saw TIL cells in their media packages within the incubator, as well as under an optical microscope. This was pretty cool, as we saw the difference between activated and inactivated TIL cells.

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Lisa Costello, learning something.

That distinction between inactive and active is one of the things on which this whole treatment concept hinges. Healthy human TIL cells can be found interpenetrated with many kinds of tumor tissue. They have an affinity for tumors, which allows them to locate and invade the tumor. But the cancer has an ability to inactivate them, or leave them inactivated, depending on the situation. In effect, the cancer can turn these immune cells off.

Dr. Rosenberg’s group, through the work of researchers such as Dr. Tran, have found that the TIL cells can be reactivated. Once turned on, they will then attack the cancer cells which they previously interpenetrated on a quiescent basis. This works in the mouse model. This works in the petri dish with human cells. This works in some human cancers, such as melanomas. Dr. Tran’s area of study is how this might work in digestive cancers, such as my metastatic colon cancer.

What they did after last Thursday’s surgery was mince most of the retrieved tumor tissue down to very fine pieces, a few millimeters in diameter at most. This is still much larger than the relevant cells, so most were not damaged. The tumor chunks were then placed in a medium which is very friendly to TIL cells. My TIL cells began outmigrating from the tumor chunks at a vigorous rate. Dr. Tran felt this was a good sign, which was also a comment made by my two primary doctors, Dr. Klebanoff and Dr. Klemen. My B cells derived from my recent apheresis have also been cultivating well. This makes all three of them hopeful for the next steps.

Where things get kind of different for me is that thanks to all you folks out there in the world, I brought my own Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) data to the party. In that data, the researchers found that my colon cancer has over 100 mutations, which is somewhat higher than normal, but not freakishly so. In identifying these mutations, the researchers can add an extra step to their protocol which they’ve only ever been able to do once before, and never with WGS data. That is to say, Dr. Tran will introduce those mutations specific to my cancer genome to my own B cells, then assessing whether my TIL cells react to any of the mutations as expressed in those B cells.

In effect, Dr. Tran can select from among my TIL cells for those mostly likely to target known mutation sites in the cancer’s genome, and thus attack only the cancer cells in my body. This adds a layer of genomic medicine to the already distinctly high-tech immunotherapy which is being studied in this protocol. He can then be sure that Dr.s Klebanoff and Klemen are working with the best possible pool of TIL cells to put back into my body in the infusion phase of the protocol.

This is about as cutting edge as it gets. The one other patient they tried this was someone they were able to do an Exome Sequencing run on, which can be critically valuable. I’m the first patient ever to bring the sequencing data in the door with me. And with my WGS data, Dr. Rosenberg’s team has the keys to the kingdom.

So Dr. Tran is using Big Science and Big Data to build the most efficient TIL cell infusion possible for Drs. Klebanoff and Klemen to go after my cancer.

The downside, such as it is, is that this filtering and selection of my TIL cells may add as much as a week to my TIL cell infusion start date, and may keep me in the NIH hospital as much as a week longer than we originally anticipated.

It doesn’t get much cooler than this. New doors in immunotherapy and genomic medicine are being opened by my case, with your support, first of the Sequence a Science Fiction Writer fundraiser last year, and ongoing right now the Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser. Even though we’ve met goal on the new fundraiser, the targeted mutation screening step has added several thousand more dollars to our costs by extending our stay in Maryland, so every dollar helps.

By reading, by promoting, by donating, by supporting, this community of my friends and fans and readers and genre folk and cancer activists and patients and caregivers have helped slap down a big old paving stone on the path to better, more effective cancer treatments. I’m out at the pointy end of the stick right now, being helped by Dr. Tran and Dr. Klebanoff and Dr. Klemen and Lisa Costello and Dad and my family and friends, but none of us would be out here on the stick without you.

Thank you so very much.

I’ll leave you with this final thought from the hallway outside the labs.

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Photos © 2008, 2014, Joseph E. Lake, Jr. All photos taken with permission.

Creative Commons License

This work by Joseph E. Lake, Jr. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

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[cancer] Field notes from Cancerland, post-operative recovery edition

The surgery

As previously indicated, the surgery went very well. There were no complications in the OR, and two tumor masses about 1.3 mm each were sent off to the TIL lab for extraction, and eventually, a great deal of expansion growth. With respect to thoracic surgery team, they were able to successfully complete my surgery with the VATS procedure. This has made my post-operative recovery much less brutal than previous procedures. Even the GI restart has gone better, presumably because of the lower levels of anesthetic required for the procedure. I am very happy with that outcome.

The TIL cell growth

Though it’s early days yet, we have received strong positive reports from the TIL cell lab. The target cells are present in the hoped-for quantities within my extracted tumor tissue, and process of enticing them out for further growth is going quite well so far. This doesn’t have any particular predictive clinical significance, but is something nice to note.

Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) and TIL cell selection

Dr.s Klebanoff and Klemen, who are managing my participation in the study, inform me that they are making good use of of the WGS data. Having a map of my mutations is allowing them to filter the TIL cells by affinity, producing a truly personalized immunotherapy poocess here. Again, my thanks to everyone who supported that fundraiser last year. It continues to pay dividends.

Post-operative complications and getting out of the hospital

We had a couple of minor-but-annoying post-operative complications. For a while I was running a fever which climbed into the danger zone, but climbed back down again. We also had issues with lung drainage and my O2 saturation. The O2 sat dropped below 80, which caused much excitement in certain quarters. I seem to have since recovered. Based on eventual post-operative healing, I should have 95-97% of my original lung capacity. Subtract from this whatever effect the dozen or so tumors in my lungs are having and I should still be oky.

All of which is to say, I’m probably fit to be discharged today, but they’ll want to recheck my lung function, recheck my infection status, and go over the state of my surgical wounds and any requirements for wound care.

Having the chest drain pulled out

This is the second time I’ve had a chest drain pulled out, and I remain convinced that is is my least favorite somatic experience, ever. The doctor was patient and let me take a dose of Lorazepam to chill out before he came in and did the deed. My dad watched, and tried for some photos without getting in the way.

photo 1

Telling healthcare professionals things they don’t want to hear

I’m a “hard stick”. To a phlebotomist or to an IV or chemo nurse, that means someone with difficult to reach veins that don’t cooperate well. Unfortunately, a great many patients with perfectly normal veins consider themselves “hard sticks”, because of bad past experiences, a dislike of needles, a desire to be treated more carefully than average, or some other reason. So when you tell someone you’re a “hard stick”, they tend to smile and nod and go about their business, because they’ve heard it all before.

Some years ago, an exasperated phlebotomist ignored my declaration that I was a “hard stick”, then poked about five dry holes in me before telling me with some surprise that I was indeed a “hard stick”. This was not news to me, I pointed out. They coached me how to explain to a phlebotomist in very specific terms that I was in fact a “hard stick”, truly a patient with difficult veins, and by-pass the natural cynicism that declaration engenders. It’s been useful.

I’ve since found another medical issues where so many people call it out to clinicians that clinicians essentially ignore that as background noise until the evidence presents itself. One is that I experience profound constipation from even relatively minimal dosages of opiates. Everybody gets constipated from opiates, so this statement from me tends to be ignored with a patronizing smile. No, really, I say, my personal best is nine days post-operative with no bowel movements, followed by a bounceback admission to the hospital to be treated for pathological constipation. That sometimes, but not always, gets their attention.

This time at NIH, I hammered on this point so frequently and so hard that I eventually got a low-opiate anesthesia and pain management plan for both surgery and post-operative recovery. When they finally took me off the epidural yesterday, the nurse told me she had my hydromorphone ready. I refused her, which startled her so much I wondered how many other patients had ever refused hydromorphone. Instead, we managed pain control with Toradol, gabapentin and Tylenol.

Meanwhile, we were pouring quite a few laxatives down me, and I was eating meals that typically cause me to have heavy, loose bowel movements. Yesterday afternoon, that dam broke with a vengeance, producing a truly astonishing amount of stool. There have been sufficient encores for us to conclude this is the real thing and my GI is back on line.

Next steps at NIH

I’ll probably be discharged from the inpatient facility today. I would expect a follow or two over the next couple of days. Our next formal involvement is coming back in a week ahead of the completed growth of my personalized TIL cells. The WGS-driven selection process may add some time, as in effect, they’ll be designed a new section of the protocol for that. I’m the first patient who’s ever com through the door with that much data.

We have asked for a tour of the TIL cell lab this week, so I can write about it here. That seems to be in train, but with no dates yet.

The earliest I’ll be back here for the next phases of treatment is a little less than two weeks. It could be three or more.

The fundraiser carries on even in the face of success

The Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser made goal. Thank you! The expenses are what they are, now and later in the year. To respond to the interest from you guys, we are working on some stretch goals. Keep an eye out.

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[links] Link salad watches the Cadillacs go creeping now through the night and the poison gas

The Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser made goal. Thank you! Meanwhile, I am still in the hospital recovering from the surgery required for the first phase TIL cell harvest. We are working on some stretch goals, if you’re interested. Keep an eye out.

Jay Lake: Der verborgene Hof – DREIMAL IM PREISRÄTSEL AUF SFBASAR.DE! — More on the German edition of Green.

A Lion in the Garden — The miracle of translation.

Homophonophobia — Ah,linguistics humor.

Antique Phonograph with Stirling Engine Hot Air Motor — Mmm. Alcohol fueled phonograph! What could possibly go wrong? (Via [info]danjite.)

What reviewers said about the first Mac when it debuted 30 years ago

The 25 most common passwords of 2013

American Locomotive: 1943 — Tanks built in a train plant.

Scientific Thinking in Business More than technology, businesses need the scientific method.

Fox News Math Fail: 137% Of Likely NJ Voters Weigh In On Gov. Christie’s GWB Scandal (INFOGRAPHIC) — Hello? FOX wrong about basic things like arithmetic. This just in: water is wet. (Snurched from Steve Buhcheit.)

Progressive Kristallnacht Coming?I would call attention to the parallels of Nazi Germany to its war on its “one percent,” namely its Jews, to the progressive war on the American one percent, namely the “rich.” This is in the Wall Street Journal. Sometimes there simply are no words.

The Brittle Grip, Part 2 — Josh Marshall with some analysis of the Perkins piece. The extremely wealthy are objectively far wealthier, far more politically powerful and find a far more indulgent political class than at any time in almost a century – at least. And yet at the same time they palpably feel more isolated, abused and powerless than at any time over the same period and sense some genuine peril to the whole mix of privileges, power and wealth they hold. There is a disconnect there that is so massive and glaring that it demands some sociocultural explanation.

GOProud co-founder gives up, leaves Republican Party[T]his is a man who has spent five years with his hand on an oven burner suddenly phoning up a reporter and saying “You know what? Fire hot.”

Long Grove plan may pave way to privatize public roads — Living in Libertarian paradise… Me, I am the kind of pinko who likes the fire department to be able to reach my house, and the food distributors to reach my neighborhood grocery stores. (Snurched from Steve Buhcheit.)

Time To Start Asking Republicans Directly: How Much Sex Is Too Much Sex? — Since Mike Huckabee raised the issue, it’s time to start discussing it. This is a terrific beginning.

?otD: All these hunters who are shrieking now, oh do they speak for us?


1/26/2014
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 5.0 hours (badly interrupted)
Body movement: n/a (in hospital)
Weight: n/a (in hospital)
Number of FEMA troops on my block inventing polar vortices: 0
Currently reading: n/a (chemo brain)

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[links] Link salad has a mysterious ache in its side

The Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser made goal. Thank you! We are working on some stretch goals, if you’re interested. Keep an eye out.

A map showing lexical distance (how much similarity there is between vocabularies) among the languages of Europe — Cool…

The Ancient Ghost City of Ani — Haunting photos.

The pending demise of Facebook (and Princeton) — This is hilarious in a very geeky way.

1984 Macintosh vs. Apple iMac: Spec Showdown

Here’s What It Looked Like When Marijuana Was Growing All Over Brooklyn — (Thanks to Lisa Costello.)

6 reasons female nudity can be powerfulA reporter’s question about Lena Dunham’s nudity pointed to a bigger issue: Naked women can threaten the status quo.

Behold, the Kindle of the 16th CenturyJust one of the “various and ingenious machines” of Captain Agostino Ramelli. (Thanks to [info]threeoutside.)

Inside Monopoly’s secret war against the Third Reich “Ask and it shall be given you; seek and ye shall find.” Fascinating. (Via David Goldman.)

Workers of the World, Faint! — I got nothing. (Via David Goldman.)

Astrobiology Underground — Deep, hot life.

Biodiversity can flourish on an urban planetFor instance, cities now support 20 percent of the world’s bird species.

Source of water ice on dark side of the Moon revealed?Interplanetary dust regularly showers the Earth and other Solar System bodies.

Rover’s decade on Mars surprises NASA A decade after landing on Mars, the rover Opportunity is still chugging along.

China Installed More Solar Power in 2013 than the US has in its Whole History — Lux fiat, baby.

The Penance of Glenn Beck — He’s a little tiny bit sorry now.

Michigan GOP official: ‘Herd all the Indians’ to Detroit, build a fence and throw in corn

Mike Huckabee and women’s uncontrolled libido, or, Uncle Sugar — This one pretty much speaks for itself. I don’t need to snark.

Why Republicans Keep Calling Women Sluts — A helpful exegesis on Huckabee’s unfortunate remarks.

?otD: Did you see them? It was dark, they were big.


1/25/2014
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 6.0 hours (badly interrupted)
Body movement: n/a (in hospital)
Weight: n/a (in hospital)
Number of FEMA troops on my block inventing polar vortices: 0
Currently reading: n/a (chemo brain)

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[cancer] The NIH Fundraiser – stretch goals?

Yesterday, the Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser made goal.

Thank you very much. This helps meet the costs for Dad and Lisa Costello to be here in Maryland, as well some of my incidentals.

One of our prize sponsors suggested we set some stretch goal prizes. I’m going to let them worry about that with the organizer, Shlom Ster. It would be nice to cover the $2,000 or so in extra costs from my last minute travel fire drill. Any money beyond that will go into my healthcare fund for future needs here at NIH or at home.

But really, to do it yesterday, while I was out for the count for surgery and recovery… You guys are awesome, and I love you. Thank you so much.

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[cancer] Surgery and the TIL harvest

Yesterday’s surgery was minimally invasive. Using the VATS technique, the thoracic surgery team were able to resect the needed tissue with a relatively modest impact on my physiological well being. There was no need to open me up. This in turn means that the surgical insult to my body is much less than it was during the 2009 wedge resection of my left lung, where my third and fourth ribs had to be spread for full access. That healing took about a year.

Yesterday afternoon while I was in the ICU, the immunotherapy doctors came by and said that their preliminary assessment of the resected tissue indicates a sufficiently robust harvest of the targeted TIL cells that we can proceed with the next steps of the immunotherapy process. This is very good news indeed.

The doctors also mentioned the Whole Genome Sequencing data has been very helpful in refining cell selection, with improved chances of good treatment outcomes. As Dr. Klebanoff explained, they would not normally have sufficient lead time to do such a study before beginning the TIL cell therapy. They’re quite excited about having this data to guide their work.

That I can offer such data to this team is down to you guys, and the fundraiser from last year. You’re helping the science that might help me, and will certainly help future cohorts of cancer patients.

Thank you. Thank you very much.

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[travel|cancer] Now in Bethesda, Maryland, and the unlikely way I got here

As of half an hour ago, I arrived at the hotel where Dad and Lisa Costello are staying. Though I was supposed to check into the NIH hospital last night, I will be there around 7:00 am this morning, about 12 hours late. My original flight to DC was cancelled yesterday morning due to weather, and a rather elaborate Rube Goldberg plan emerged in its place.

I’ll let my Tweetstream tell the story…

That doesn’t even cover all the bases, like the poor passenger having the panic attack and my long conversation about Omaha.

All in all, I got about three hours of sleep last night, non-contiguously. Also, I added close to $2,000 to my expenses in additional unbudgeted costs for this whole farrago. If you feel like it, please promote or donate to the Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) fundraiser for my NIH collateral expenses.

But I am here. And shortly I will be at the hospital, bushy-eyed and bright-tailed and ready to assist in advancing the cause of healthcare research.

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[links] Link salad knows that fire is the devil’s only friend

Science Fiction Author on Trial (NIH trial, that is!) — The fundraiser for my NIH collateral expenses continues. If you haven’t already done so, please do check it out and pass the word.

The London ArrayThe world’s largest wind farm has been planted just off of the mouth of the River Thames. Oh, cool photos.

Hello World: Hibernating Rosetta Comet Probe Awakens

Are We Alone? NASA’s 30-Year Goal to Answer Astrophysics’ Greatest Question “For the first time, we will identify continents and oceans—and perhaps the signatures of life—on distant worlds,” says NASA in its 30-year vision for astrophysics.

Sex abuse files on 30 Chicago priests going publicAttorneys say the documents will show that the archdiocese concealed the abuse for decades. That’s not what Jesus meant in Matthew 19:14.

Wait. Texas Is Spending HOW Much Money to Violate the Constitution? — I love those Constitutional absolutists with their unswerving loyalty to the letter of the document. No, wait that’s the Second Amendment. The First Amendment is entirely fungible.

Executives quit after massive South Korea data theftThe alleged theft of 104m credit card account details by a lone security contractor has left thousands of South Koreans forming long lines in bank branches to cancel their cards, as three dozen financial executives resign in disgrace. Can you imagine American financial executives doing such a thing?

A Wall Streeter comes clean — This is fascinating to the point of alarming.

From ‘I don’t want any part of Obamacare’ to ‘It’s a godsend’ — The transition from ideological hatred to the hard realities of living with serious illness.

NSA-o-Matic! — Your automatic NSA spin generator! (Via David Goldman.)

If Dr. King was in Fact a “Republican”, I Too Can Entertain Some Fantasies: Was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. a Space Alien? If Dr. King was a Porn Star, What Would He Have Chosen For a Stage Name?Dr. King would be disgusted with the Democratic Party, as it is just the more Left-wing of a two party political system that is stridently conservative, and neither serves the public interest nor the public good. Moreover, Brother King was not beholden to either political party. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. held the Republicans in especially low regard. (Via [info]threeoutside.)

?otD: Where were you the day the music died?


1/21/2014
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (chemo brain)
Hours slept: 6.25 hours (solid)
Body movement: 30 minute stationary bike ride
Weight: 238.8
Number of FEMA troops on my block BENGHAZI! BENGHAZI! BENGHAZI!: 0
Currently reading: n/a (chemo brain)

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