[links] Link salad sings a song, sounds like it’s singing “Ooo, baby, ooo”

What Will BeKim Stanley Robinson’s 2312, a sci-fi novel so brilliant, it reads like an account of the past.

Darwin’s Ghosts, By Rebecca StottBefore ‘Origin of Species’, many European and Arabic thinkers had outlined the principles of natural selection.

Cook’s View of the Transit of Venus — This is cool. 18th century science, on the hoof.

What You Hate Most About Waiting in Line

The Amazon Effect — An interesting history of everybody’s favorite serial market power abuser.

2 troubling examples of Google’s conflicts — Google showed their hand with the banal evil that is the Google Books settlement, which in its current proposed form overturns three centuries of copyright law and abrogates core intellectual property rights of all authors everywhere in favor of one corporation’s interests. Their famous motto is long dead, why would anyone be surprised now?

Are women better than men? — Roger Ebert on writing triggery and ill-advised blog posts.

“We are a sideshow no longer”At his first same-sex marriage since Obama’s big announcement, a longtime advocate reflects on a decades-long fight. (Via Slacktivist Fred Clark.)

Conservatives Attack Scientific Findings About Why They Hate Science (Helping to Confirm the Science)Some would like to dismiss the inconvenient findings about the political right, but the science won’t let them.

How Obama Was Dangerously Naive About STUXNET and CyberwarfareA Times exposé suggests that the White House failed to consider how our own cyberweapons would be used against us. Juan Cole with more on this.

?otd: Do the clouds expect it when it rains?


6/3/2012
Writing time yesterday: 0.0 hours (spent the day cleaning)
Body movement: 30 minute stationary bike ride
Hours slept: 6.25 (solid)
Weight: 242.4 (!!)
Currently reading: Shattering the Ley by Benjamin Tate

2 thoughts on “[links] Link salad sings a song, sounds like it’s singing “Ooo, baby, ooo”

  1. Cora says:

    I found the original Roger Ebert post problematic, because it regurgitated a whole lot of biologistic junk about women being naturally nicer, kinder, more empathetic, more nurturing, etc…

    However, the extreme reaction he got was because his post was targeted by a mob of internet misogynists who immediately swarm any post or article that is even remotely concerned with feminism, gender issues or the fact that women are more than walking sex toys/incubators. These people even attack innocuous fare such as book reviews, interviews with romance writers, etc… The tactics of this group are similar to some of the noisy people with political agendas which populate the online SFF community, though their goals couldn’t be any more different.

    Hence, even though I disagreed with Ebert’s original post, the only ill-advised thing he did was blogging about a topic which was sure to bring the trolls to his doorstep. Which is a problem in itself, because certain subjects have become no-go areas in certain communities, since no one wants to bring the trolls down on themselves.

    1. Jay says:

      Boy have I learned very much the hard way about summoning the trolls. Sigh.

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